Scientist List

Family name

Firsttname

Qualifications

occupation

reaction or

my  proposal

 

Baccarini

Matteo PhD 
Philosophy

research is concerning  the relation between action and space and the way we represent our body.

Universita' degli Studi di Ferrara

Italy

Please read chapter  1 and 2

Benazzi

Stefano

Associate Professor, Department of Cultural Heritage, University of Bologna,

the teeth from Grotta del Cavallo represent the oldest European anatomically modern humans currently known.

Italy

please read chapter 1 and 10, section f

Bjorklund

David F.

Professor of Psychology at Florida Atlantic University

His books include The Origins of Human Nature: Evolutionary Developmental Psychology

USA

please read chapter 1 and chapter 4, section  c

Boyd

Robert  an American anthropologist. He is Professor of the School of Human Evolution and Social Change (SHESC) at Arizona State University (ASU)

he wrote the textbook How Humans Evolved.

USA

please read chapter 1, 7 and 10, section d

Byrne

Richard William

Professor School of Psychology & Neuroscience

Centre for Social Learning & Cognitive Evolution

United Kingdom

please read chapter 1 and 5

and 11, section e

Cappuccio

Massimiliano

Dr. Philosophy United Arab Emirates University (UAEU) 

Philosophy of MindSport PsychologyEmbodied CognitionArtificial IntelligenceSocial Cognition

Most recent publications are focused on empathy (embodied simulation),

United Arab Emirates

Please read chapter 1 and 2

Clark

Andy

Prof. at Logic and Metaphysics in the School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences, at Edinburgh University in Scotland

United Kingdom.

20.2.2016

your picture of evolutionary facilitation is spot on

Please read chapter 10, section k

Colom

Roberto

Professor of Psychology Universidad Autonoma de Madrid

Spain

21.12.2015

I love the idea of incorporating the body

Please read chapter 10, section k

Cosmides

Leda

Professor Psychological Brain Sciences UC Santa Barbara

Developmental and Evolutionary Psychology

I work in the newly emerging field of evolutionary psychology. Evolutionary psychology weaves together cognitive science, human evolution, hunter gatherer studies, neuroscience, psychology and evolutionary biology, in an attempt to understand and map the human mind and brain

USA

Please read chapter 1, 2 and 7

Crone

Eveline

Prof. Dr. Institute of psychology at the University of Leiden

The Netherlands

12.1.2015

uw theorie zeker interessant (your theory certainly interesting)

Dawkins

Richard

Honorary Dr.Author of many books on evolution, among them:

The Greatest Show on Earth: The Evidence for Evolution.

United Kingdom

Please read chapter 1 and 11 section e

.

Chapter 10, section d will prove that there was more needed than evolution alone to create the present human

Dessalles

Jean-Louis  

PhD I developed several arguments to show that human communication did not emerge as a form of cooperation. I am suggesting that the biological function of human language is to display qualities that are sought after when choosing profitable coalition partners

France

Please read chapter 1 and chapter 5, sections b, c and d

Dicke

Ursula

Prof. Dr Biology/Chemistry
Neurobiology

Brain Research Institute
Bremen
Research: Selection of motor programs; formation of habits

Germany

Please read chapter 1 and hapter 4

Dunbar

Robin

Professor of evolutionary psychology

University of Oxford,

Evolution of sociality and cognition

My research is concerned with trying to understand the behavioural, cognitive and neuroendocrinological mechanisms that underpin social bonding in primates (in general) and humans (in particular).

United Kingdom

Please read chapter 1 and 5 section d through f

Flynn

Jim

(the man behind the Flynn-effect)

Emeritus Professor of Political Studies at the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand

23.3.2016

Looks interesting

See figure 43 in chapter 10, section i for Flynn-effect

Gallagher

Shaun

Prof.of Philosophy, 

University of Memphis

Phenomenologyphilosophy of mindphilosophy of cognitive scienceselfhermeneutics

book: How the body shapes the mind

USA

Please read chapter  1 and 2

Gariépy

Jean-François

researcher at the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University. 

interested in how the brain generates social behavior

USA

Please read chapter  1, 2 and 5, section g

Goodal

Jane

Dr honorary doctorate degree at 4 Universities

British primatologist, ethologist, anthropologist, and UN Messenger of Peace. Considered to be the world's foremost expert on chimpanzees

Please read chapter  1, 2 and 6

Haier

RICHARD J.

 Prof. Dr.of the the School of Medicine at the University of California

He uses neuro imaging to study how brain function and structure relate to intelligence, 

He is the editor-in-chief of Intelligence and the past president of the International Society for Intelligence Research. His book introduces new and provocative neuroscience research

USA

Please read chapter  1, 2 and Chapter 10, section d

Hawks

John

is the Vilas-Borghesi Distinguished Achievement Professor of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin—Madison.

I work on the fossil and genetic record of human evolution 

I disagree with the idea that H. naledi is the same species as H. habilis

USA

Please read chapter 1 and 7, section a

Hoffman

Philip T.

Prof.He is interested in combining economic theory and historical evidence to explain long-term changes in politics, society,
and the economy—in particular, economic growth and political development.

Book: How Europe Conquered the World

Princeton University Press, 2015

USA

Please read chapter  1, 2 and 10, section k

Hublin

Jean-Jacques

Prof.Director Department of Human Evolution 
Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology 
Germany 

2015: A 2.8 Ma old mandible unearthed in Ethiopia fills the gap between ape-like australopithecines and representatives of the genus Homo. It pushes the origin of large-brained hominins further back in time and highlights the complexity of the human evolutionary tree.

Germany

Please read chapter  1, 2 and 7, section a through f

Hyun Ko

Kwang

Hanyang University

AnthropologyBiology

reviews various theories of bipedalism and provides a holistic answer to human evolution

The beginnings of the reciprocal cause and effect between brain evolution and tool-making cannot be identified.

  Korea

Please read chapter  1, 2 and 7, section a through f

Take note of this quote: It may be obvious that this course of events caused the arsenal of object manipulations to grow substantially, as thus did the intelligence.

Jelbert

Sarah

PhD Comparative Cognition Lab Department of Psychology 
University of Cambridge

Research: evolution and development of physical cognition among human children, jays and crows

United Kingdom

Please read chapter  1, 2

Kooijmans

Leendert P. Louwe  

 Prof.prehistoric archaeology at Leiden University

The Netherlands 

23.6.2017

uw ideeën zijn interessant en sporen ook wel met de “officiële” wetenschap

(your ideas are interesting and trace also with the "official" science)

Leader

Darian

Psychoanalyst and author

Honorary Visiting Professor in Psychoanalysis at Roehampton University
United Kingdom

7 July 2017

Many thanks for your fascinating website

Maravita

Angelo

Prof. Dr. Main research topics include body representation in the brain Università degli Studi di Milano · Department of Psychology Milano

Italy

Please read chapter  1 and 2

Matsu

zawa

Tetsuro

Prof.Distinguished Professor, Kyoto University Institute for Advanced Study (KUIAS)

Professor, Primate Research Institute of Kyoto University

Please read Chapter 1 and 2, section b

and 11, section e

Menary

Richard

BA, MSc, PhD

is currently ARC future fellow and senior lecturer in philosophy at Macquarie University in Sydney 

cognition is the coordination of bodily processes of the organism with salient features of the environment, often created or maintained by the organism

Australia

Please read Chapter 1 and 2, section d

From the latter I quote: Animals, therefore, do not think of manipulations, they merely apply them in response to a particular circumstance. The circumstance consists of an observed object or image of part of their environment.

Müller

 Gerd B

professor at the University of Vienna where he heads the Department of Theoretical Biology in the Center for Organismal Systems Biology.

theoretical biologist who concentrates on the role of developmental processes in evolutionary innovation.

Austria

Please read Chapter 1, 2 and 4

Pearce

Eiluned

Dr Oxford Biological Anthropology

research has identified morphological differences between the brains of Neanderthals and anatomically modern humans

United Kingdom

Please read Chapter 1, 2 and 10, section e and f

The latter describes that the Neanderthaler had a bigger skull but less wiring between the neurons than H.sapiens

Pfeifer 

Rolf.

Prof. Em. Was a specially appointed professor at Osaka University

His research interests include Embodied cognitionBioroboticsAutonomous agents/mobile robots, Artificial life

Switserland

Please read Chapter 1 and 2, section b

Plomin

Robert

Professor of Behavioural Genetics

Best known for his work in twin studies and behavior genetics

Book: Nature And Nurture: An Introduction To Human Behavioral Genetics,2004

United Kingdom

please read chapter 1 and 10, section e

Posthuma

. Danielle

 Prof. Dr statistical geneticist at the Vrije Universiteit (VU) Amsterdam and VU University Medical Center Amsterdam (VU)

 She integrates knowledge and methods from different fields biology, genetics, neuroimaging, bioinformatics.

The Netherlands

Please read Chapter 1 and 2, section b

Radman

Zdravko, Ph. D.
Professor of Institute of Philosophy Zagreb.

Cognitive Science and Philosophy of Mind

Natural and ‘Artificial’ Mind: From Causality to Intentionality

Croatia

Please read chapter 1 and chapter 7, section k

Resing

Wilma

Prof. Dr Diagnostics and Research of Intelligence and Potential for Learning

Leiden Universuty

The Netherlands

Please read chapter 1 and  2

Roth

Gerhard

Prof. Brain Research Institute, University of Bremen, D-28334,

Intelligence has evolved many times independently among vertebrates. Primates, elephants and cetaceans are assumed to be more intelligent than ‘lower’ mammals, the great apes and humans more than monkeys, and humans more than the great apes. 

Please read chapter 1 and  chapter 4, sectio n i

Sabbatini

Renato

Prof. PhD Manager Edumed Institute

biomedical and computer scientist, educator, publisher

article:The Evolution of Human Intelligence

Brazil

Please read chapter 1 and chapter 4, section i

Shepherd

Stephen v.  

PhD

Researcher at The Rockefeller University (Laboratory of Neural Systems)

 His book: The Wiley Handbook of Evolutionary Neuroscience

USA

Please read chapter 1 and 2.

Chapter 10 section d shows that evolution was not enogh to create the present man

Slurink

Dr. Pouwel

evolutionary epistemology and ethics

Why are we here?

The Netherlands 

Please read chapter 1, man emerged because animals can invent new manipulations which do survive them better.

Sterck

Liesbeth

Prof. Dr. Expertise: Primate social cognition.

In humans, aggression is often seen as a bad natural inclination and being friendly more as civilized behavior. If this is the case, then monkeys must be very civilized indeed! In monkey groups, friendly behavior has been shown to be far more prevalent than aggressive behaviors

The Netherlands

Please read chapter 1 and chapter 7, section g

Sternberg

Robert

Professor is currently of psychology at Yale University, where he has been since 1975.

main research interests are in intelligence, creativity, wisdom, thinking styles, leadership, ethics, love, jealousy, envy, and hate

Known forTriarchic theory of intelligence

USA

I propose you compare my very simple Theory for intelligence against your Triarchic theory.

Please read Chapter 1 and 2.

Stoneking

Mark

Prof.Group Leader, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, and Honorary Professor of Biological Anthropology, University of Leipzig,

He and Rebecca Cann found that all living humans were descended through a single mother, who lived ~200,000 years ago in Africa.

Germany

Please read Chapter 1 and 2

See how your findings agree with my arguings in Chapter 7

Stout

Dietrich

Associate Professor

Department of Anthropology Emory University

Long-standing speculations and more recent hypotheses propose a variety of possible evolutionary connections between language, gesture and tool use.

USA

Please read chapter 1 and chapter 5 sectio d trhough f

Stringer

Christopher Brian   Prof.is a British physical anthropologist noted for his work on human evolution.

I'm now a Research Leader in Human Origins. 

Book:  published in the USA as Lone Survivors: how we came to be the only humans on Earth

United Kingdom

Please read chapter 7

Vos

Dr. John de

Research associate - Taxonomy and Systematics, Fossil Macrovertebrates

At Museum Naturalis Biodiversity Center , Leiden, Neth. Also proofreader of the manuscript in 2014 and 2015

The Netherlands

2015

inhoud geheel voor rekening van de auteur

(content is the sole responsibility of the author)

Waal

Frans de

C. H. Candler Professor of Primate Behavior

Emory University
Atlanta,

USA

23.1.2015

Interessante hypothese, die verband houdt met "embodied intelligence," (Interesting hypothesis, which relates to “embodied intelligence”)

Please read chapter 9, section c

Whiten

Andrew  

Emeritus Professor Wardlaw Professor of Psychology, University of St Andrews

Social Cognition

Evolutionary-, Comparative- and Developmental PsychologySocial Learning

Recent and current research interests focus on social learning, traditions and culture

United Kingdom

Please read chapter 1 and chapter 7, section l

Willoughby

Pamela R.

 is Chair, Department of Anthropology, University of Alberta, Edmonton

Aereas of interest: Palaeoanthropology (Human Evolution), stone tool analysis, Old World, Africa; generally the study of fossil humans, their evolution and culture

Canada

Please read chapter 7, section c through f

Wynne

Clive D.L., PhD

Professor of Psychology

Arizona State University

Major Works

Animal Cognition: Evolution, Behavior and Cognition

I am a behavioral scientist with a fascination for dogs and their wild relatives.

USA

Please read Chapter 1, 2 and 9b, item Dog